Course

III.H – Criminal Law

8 Lessons

California Security Officers with Registrations (guard cards)  must receive 40 hours of training as follows:

  • 8 hours “Powers to Arrest” prior to an Officer standing post.
  • 16 hours of training within 30 days of issuance of registration, 8 of which must consist of two four-hour courses from the mandatory modules and 8 of which must consist of elective courses.
  • 16 hours of training within 6 months of issuance of registration, 8 of which must consist of the remaining two four- hour courses from the mandatory modules, and 8 of which must consist of elective courses.

This course module, titled “Advance Criminal Laws” complies with requirements of AB 2880 and Bureau of Security & Investigative Services (BSIS) training directives as in compliance with Business and Professions Code Sections 7583.6 and 7583.7 and Title 16, Division 7, Article 9, Section 643 of the California Code of Regulations.

This course corresponds to module III.H of the BSIS Course Outline. This is an elective course under the Course Outline and satisfies the requirement for 4 hours of training under the elective section of the Security Officer Training Laws and Regulations.

III.H – Advanced Criminal Laws – 4 Hours

  • The officer will learn about the general nature of criminal law.
  • The officer will learn of the different classifications of crimes.
  • The officer will learn about the basic different types of crimes.
  • The officer will learn about the general law concerning the power to arrest.
  • The officer will learn what constitutes probable cause with respect to an officer’s right to detain an individual.
  • The officer will learn what constitutes reasonable force in the process of an arrest.
  • The officer will learn the general law concerning searches of a detained person, including what constitutes an unreasonable search.
  • The officer will learn about the exclusionary rule, how it is applied, and examples of where evidence was excluded as the result of an improper search or seizure.
  • The officer will learn about the rule against self-incrimination and how this rule applies to the work of a security officer.
  • The officer will learn about the right to counsel and how this right applies to the work of a security officer.
  • The officer will learn the general rules regarding the shopkeeper’s privilege and how it applies to the search and seizure of a suspected shoplifter.
  • The officer will learn about the criminal process subsequent to an arrest, including arraignment, trial, conviction, and appeals.

1. Criminal Law in General

A. Classification of Crimes
B. Crimes Against Person
C. Crimes Against Property
D. Crimes Against Public

2. Arrest

A. Penal Code Section 836 and 837
B. Differences Between Penal Code Section 836 and 837
C. Applicability of Penal Code Section 837 to security officers
D. Timing of Arrest
E. Probable Cause to Detain
F. Use of Reasonable Force

3. Searches

A. Definition of Search
B. Definition of Reasonable Search
C. Examples of Unreasonable Searches

4. Exclusionary Rule

A. Applicability.
B. Examples where Evidence is Excluded.

5. Fifth and Sixth Amendment

A. Privilege Against Self-Incrimination
B. Applicability of Privilege Against Self-Incrimination to Security Officers
C. Right to Counsel
D. Applicability of Right to Counsel to Security Officers

6. The Shopkeeper’s Privilege

A. General Rule
B. Search of a Private Person
C. Search of a Person’s Belongings
D. Search for Weapons
E. Seizure of Property

7. The Criminal Process

A. Detention and Arrest
B. Election to Prosecute
C. Court Process
D. Appeals
E. Difference between County Jail and State Prison
F. Difference between Parole and Probation

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